Wednesday, 28 December 2016

Leman Russ, Lord of the Rout

I finally finished Russ. Here he is! I'm looking forward to getting him out on the battle field now.


Master of the Space Wolves Legion and Lord of icy Death World of Fenris, Leman Russ was an incomparable warlord, ferocious beyond measure and faultlessly loyal to the Emperor and his Imperium. Known as the Wolf King and the Lord of Winter and Ruin, as undoubtedly as savage as Leman Russ was, he was also wise beyond his Legion’s barbaric appearances and self-aware to a degree few guessed at, which made him doubly dangerous.



At Prospero his loyalty and foresight were used against him by the machinations of Horus, as he was loosed upon his brother Magnus. What was to follow was one of the darkest hours of the Imperium’s history, as Space Marine was set against Space Marine in war unto the death. The Burning of Prospero was a conflict eclipsed only by the nightmare civil war that came after.


Fighting with a ferocity and skill far beyond anything human, Leman Russ wields the sword of Balenight, known as Mjalnar, an ancient blade whose dark legend stretched back to the Age of Strife; and Helwinter, Russ’ great frost axe, its murderous edge made with the kraken-teeth of a mighty beast Russ slew himself. His warplate is a suit of singular artificer power armour, incorporating unique exothermic field generators, otherwise unknown of in the Imperium’s arsenal of technology.


I really enjoyed painting this miniature, I really pushed my abilities. It is probably the most time I have spent on a single miniature for a long time, but I cut no corners and spared no expense in getting this to look how I wanted it to.

I've trying all sorts of techniques I've never done before. Two that I'll share now are:

Hair: usually the hair on my minis is brown, black or bleached bone. The Forge World version of Leman Russ has blonde hair, so I thought I'd attempt it. The scheme I used is undercoat white, wash with Agrax Earthshade, wash with Lamenters Yellow. Using yellow on hair is my worst nightmare but I was assured by the Twitter crowd that this is how to do it. And I think it looks ok. I could have made it brighter I guess, but I only did one layer of white, so some of the grey base coat is still showing through.

Armour: usually I go for mechanicum standard grey base, then two dry brushes of successively lighter grey, then Agrax Earthshade wash. That looks good, but I wanted Leman Russ to stand out. The Forge World version has a slightly greenish tint, I wanted to go for a blue tint. So I went for the grey base and two-stage dry brush, then applied a 65:35 mix of Nuln Oil and blue glaze. I think it looks pretty good. It's not as blue as I wanted but I'm happy with it.

For the base I am going for white columns and brown earth to tie Russ in to the rest of my force.

I still have the skin, gold elements and weapons to go. Even the wolf pelts I am trying something different.

There looks like there are a lot of colours there, but it all ties together, yet stands out from the rest on the army in a good way. The basic palette is grey (armour and ruins), brown (fur and mud), gold (details) and red (cape, leather and blood), using a variety of shades of each. The spot colour is blue, used on the gems and differently on the power weapon's energy source. There are a lot of textures around the model and trying to do them all justice was difficult.

The runes, I wanted them to look like marble so I tried sponging. That didn't look quite right, so I added some layering, to look like the saw cuts you see in polished marble.

I'm happy with him anyway!

Comments and criticisms welcome. Fluff is from the Forge World Website.

Dave

theerrantwolf.blogspot.co.uk - a blog dedicated to The Horus Heresy and Warhammer 40k

3 comments:

  1. Absolutely beautifully model, attention to detail is fantastic. I'm getting there myself, slowly but surely, only another 20 years or so:-)

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  2. Great work and you can see the extra effort put into it. Really pays off, bravo.

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  3. Sweet sweet work. Base is particularly well done.

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